PostHeaderIcon Credibility requires Detail (the 2nd Law)

Most projects are underplanned. They’re already late before they start. For a host of reasons – the usual suspects include a lack of project management discipline, inadequate tools and training, unclear objectives, top-down influence, overworked and under pressure team members – projects get planned with insufficient detail.

The reality is that detail is the basis for accuracy in all projects. Plans that lack appropriate detail can’t be believed. This is what I call the Second Law of project management.

The consequence of a lack of detail is a project suicide spiral:

Understate what’s needed… Misunderstand what ‘done’ looks like… Miss stuff out… Underestimate time and effort requirements to do the work… Overcommit resources to unrealistic schedules…
Present bad news to customer.

Breakdown Checks

Without a credible plan, a project manager lacks credibility with the team and stakeholders. Only when we get to the detail is the full extent of work revealed, which means developing a great Work Breakdown Structure. Here are a few WBS must-do’s:

  • Ensure tasks are small enough so that-
    • Estimates of effort and duration are as accurate and credible as possible
    • Task durations are typically no greater than the time between progress updates
  • Define explicitly what ‘done’ means-
    • Especially for any task that is unfamiliar, complex or difficult to break down
  • Assign a single owner to each task-
    • Have them verify that the expected workflow minimizes likelihood of any missing tasks
  • Use a checklist of often forgotten tasks-
    • e.g. meetings, defect resolutions, reviews and approval cycles.

They say the devil is in the details – and just looking for a chance to cause trouble. Good process and a little extra planning time will build protection.

(See all 5 Laws summarized in The 5 Laws of Effective Project Management)

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